Year: 2020

River Restoration: Fluvial-Geomorphic and Ecological Tools

22-26 June 2020, Beaumont du Ventoux, Provence FR

https://institutbeaumont.org

This shortcourse/workshop emphasizes understanding geomorphic process as a sound basis for planning and designing river restoration projects and programs, with specific applications and field visits to Mediterranean and mountain environments. The course draws heavily on innovative process based river restoration and management experiences in France and elsewhere in the EU, complemented by experiences in North America. Instruction includes lectures, field exercises, problem sets and workshops on approaches to planning and implementing process-based restoration, with instructors drawn from both sides of the Atlantic.

STUDENT PRESENTATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS – 14TH ANNUAL RIVER RESTORATION SYMPOSIUM

What’s Past is Present: A Re-Evaluation of Cerrito Creek

Matthew Sasaki, Mingyao Wang, Thea Yang

 

Post-Project Appraisal of Arroyo Viejo Improvement Project, Oakland, Californi

Jonathan McCall, Eric Garcia, Jill Dressler

 

Case Study: Pond and Plug Restoration at the Perazzo Meadows in the Northern Sierra Nevadas

Berenice Gonzalez, Daria Kieffer, Christopher Kingsley, Beatriz Stambuk-Torres, Erina Szeto

 

Post-Project Appraisal of Santa Rosa Creek Restoration

Charlie Yue, Elizabeth Hurley, Elyssa Lawrence, Zhiyao Shu

 

The Social Life of a Creek San Anselmo Creek Park Redesign

Yuling Chen, Arturo Fuentes-Ortiz, Celina Gu, Chenny Wang

 

Floodplain Restoration at the Old Orick Mill Site

Chandra Vogt, Eiji Jimbo, Jason Lin, Daniela Corvillon

 

Geomorphic and Hydraulic Controls on Coho Salmon Outmigration in the Russian River Watershed, California

Brian Kastl, Lukas Winklerprins, Kyle Leathers, Zack Dinh, and Shelby Witherby

 

Persistence and Effectiveness of Livewood as Large Wood in River Restoration

Danielle Charleston, Melissa Hassler, Kelsey Wilson

Student Presentations and Publications – 15th Annual River Restoration Symposium

Evaluating the effectiveness of restored side channel habitat, Lagunitas Creek
Chris Williams, Stephanie Clarke, Rachael Ryan, Jessie Moravek

Carbon emissions of a conventional restoration project vs a river’s restorative power
Timur Maraghe, Angadpreet Brar, Natan Johnson Lennon

Comparing Vermont stream corridors with Washington State’s channel migration zones
Will Pitkin

Urban river restoration on the Truckee: social vs ecological
Spencer Lacy, Faisal Ashraf, Gurjot Kohli, Yitao Li, James Hansen

Baxter Creek Gateway Park Restoration: a post-project appraisal
Yiwen Chen, Yuanshuo Pi

Cerrito Creek within Blake Garden: Opportunities for restoration
Moyan Chen, Nery Barrera Lopez, Tanner Howe, Sara Mahmoud, Tim Cole

Restoring Process in Rivers: Results from the 15th Annual Berkeley River Restoration Symposium at UC Berkeley

While the US was arguably more active in river restoration in the 1980s, most of the projects now undertaken in the US are still form-based attempts to create idealized features.  In many cases, these artificial constructions are not sustained by current, altered river processes.  In the EU, by contrast, many projects explicitly aim to restore process, even when this means allowing a ‘messy’ river to develop.

How can we restore true geomorphic and ecological processes in rivers?  This question was addressed in the 15th Annual Berkeley River Restoration Symposium (7 December 2019), in keynote talks by Hervé Piégay of CNRS (the French national research agency) and University of Lyon, and Damion Ciotti of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.  Piégay’s talk, Revitalizing rivers: learning from a few European case studies, summarized some of the key lessons learned from recent restoration efforts in the EU.  Despite more projects in the US now claiming to be ‘process based’, real restoration of process is rare. How can we distinguish true process-based restoration projects?  Damion Ciotti’s talk, ‘Process-based design criteria for ecological restoration’ presented four distinct attributes of true process-based restoration, along with a detailed illustration of the application of these criteria to a restoration project in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada.

In addition to these keynote talks, graduate students in the River Restoration course presented their independent research projects, including a comparison of a conventional salmon spawning habitat restoration project heavily dependent on external energy sources (diesel fuel) with the energy exerted on the ‘restored’ reach by a natural flood; an evaluation of a side-channel restoration for salmon on Lagunitas Creek; the Vermont and Washington State programs to set aside river corridors; and post-project appraisals of river restoration projects on the Truckee River, Reno, and Cerrito and Baxter Creeks in the San Francisco Bay region.  Panels of experienced practitioners and researchers provided perspective on themes arising in the presentations.  Click here to see the papers summarizing the graduate student research projects.

The symposium is presented annually by the UC Berkeley Department of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning, and the Institute of International Studies Interdisciplinary Faculty Seminar Water Management: Past and Future Adaptation.

Keynote Speaker Bios

Hervé Piégay is research director at the National Center of Scientific Research, at the laboratory Environnement, Ville, Societe, based at the Ecole Normale Supérieure of Lyon (France). His Ph.D. (1995) documented interactions between riparian vegetation and channel geomorphology. His research is focused on river management, planning and restoration, contemporary history of rivers and their catchments, analyzing human controls on environmental change, floodplain and former channel sedimentation, sediment transport, and budgeting.  His work involves integrated sciences, with a strong emphasis on methodological frameworks and innovative tools using tracking techniques, GIS and remote sensing. He frequently works with practitioners to provide insights for river management, planning, and restoration.

Damion Ciotti is a Restoration Biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service in Auburn California. He has over 10 years of experience in design and implementation of stream, river, and wetland restoration in the Sierra, Cascades, Great Basin and Appalachia. Major projects include restoration of stream delta systems in the upper Klamath Basin and stream and floodplain reconnections in the Sierra and Cascades. He is interested in testing applications of ecological science and theory to restoration practice. He also coordinates the Tribal Grants Program for the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Damion has an MS in Environmental Science from Oregon State University and a BS in Soil Science from Penn State and was a Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay.

About the Class

Restoration of Rivers and Streams (Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 227) is taught by Professor Matt Kondolf.  Offered annually since 1992, it is the longest-running course devoted to river restoration at a major research university. This graduate-level course emphasizes understanding of underlying goals and assumptions of restoration, and integration of science into restoration planning and design. Students review restoration plans and evaluate completed projects. In addition to lectures and discussions by the instructor, students, and an extraordinary set of guest lecturers drawn from the active restoration community, the principal course requirement is an independent term project involving original research and a presentation at this Symposium.

 

 

Restoring river habitats below dams through gravel augmentation and bank erosion

Building on recent research on the Rhine River between France and Germany, a research team based in Strasbourg has published a review of scientific literature on projects to restore channel complexity downstream of dams.  While dam removal has attracted enormous attention in recent years, with notable successes on the Elwha River, the reality is that most dams are here to stay and most river reaches in the developed world are downstream of dams.  As these dams capture sediment, they create conditions of sediment deficit in many river reaches downstream. This review found relatively few studies documenting projects to restore sediment supply via gravel augmentation and fewer still via restoration of channel erosion processes below dams (mostly examples from northern Europe).  Biological monitoring shows benefits from these projects, whose increasing popularity reflects growing interest in restoration of fluvial process, and an evolving perspective towards adaptive or coupling management approaches to promote the recovery of natural processes in rivers below many dams and thus to improve ecological response.  

 

The paper, Restoring fluvial forms and processes by gravel augmentation or bank erosion below dams: A systematic review of ecological responses, by Cybil Staentzel et al. is available for free download here until 01 February 2020.