Month: October 2019

Innovations in River Management, Germany and USA: Integrating Ecosystem Restoration Into Flood Risk Management

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

223 Moses Hall – UC Berkeley

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Agenda

08.30      Coffee

08.45      Welcome & Introductions

Anna Serra-Llobet, Sonja Jähnig, Matt Kondolf

09.00      Policy Innovations: USA, California, EU, Germany

Eileen Fretz-Shader (American Rivers),  John Cain (River Partners), Anna Serra-Llobet (UC Berkeley), Sonja Jähnig (IGB Berlin)

10.00      Coffee break

10.20      Successful Projects: USA, California                                                      Jeff Opperman (World Wildlife Fund), Sarah Yarnell (UC Davis), Ted Grantham (UC Berkeley)

11.20      Discussion Led by Matt Kondolf (UC Berkeley)

11.40      Group Photo & Lunch

1.00 p     Successful Projects: EU, Germany

Mathias Scholz (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig), Jürgen Geist (Technical University of Munich), Christian Damm (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)

2.00p      Discussion Led by Sonja Jähnig (IGB Berlin)

3.00p      Reflections: When can flood risk management and ecosystem restoration work together?

Jay Lund (UC Davis)

3.30p      Coffee break

3.50p      Open Discussion: What can we learn from each other?  What elements can we draw from the other country to improve our approach?  Led by Heidi Hall (DWR) and Rafael Schmitt (Stanford University)

5.00p      Closing Comments  Sonja Jähnig & Matt Kondolf

5.30p      Adjourn

Contemporizing Traditional Water-Architecture: Birkha Bawari, a 21st-Century Step Well
Tuesday 15 October 230-4pm.  Rm 223 Moses Hall
Presented by A Mridul, Architect, Jodhpur, India

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Step wells are large wells that allow people to descend via steps to the water table, where they can obtain water to carry back up to the surface.  These features were widespread in India and in active use from the 2nd century AD to the end of the 19th Century, when they were superseded by more modern water infrastructure of canals and pipes and largely forgotten.  Today these step wells are being revisited as sustainable water management features, and appreciated for their exquisite beauty.  Following traditional patterns, a new such step-well was recently built in Jodhpur, a water-stressed city on the fringe of the Thar Desert of India, with capacity of >17 million liters of rainwater.  Architect A Mridul discusses step wells and his design for the Jodhpur well, using site-quarried sandstone and local artisans.

A Mridul is a Jodhpur-based architect whose practice emphasizes integrating cultural heritage, contemporizing traditional practices to make them timeless and relevant to current generations.  He is passionate about the ancient water heritage of India and has been campaigning for its regeneration, mainstreaming and replication.

This talk is presented as part of the Institute of International Studies Interdisciplinary Faculty Seminar Water Management: Past and Future Adaptation and is co-sponsored by the Institute for South Asia Studies.